A pleasing touch..

The Toyota Camry is a mid-size car, formerly a compact car manufactured by Toyota since 1980. The name “Camry” comes from a phonetic transcription of the Japanese word kanmuri, which means “crown”, a tradition started with the Toyota Crown in the 1950s, and continued with the Corolla and Corona, which are also latin words for “crown”.

For the East and Southeast Asian markets, high specification Camry models are seen as executive cars. Since the sixth generation SXV30 model, the Camrys sold in these markets have sported revised front- and rear-end treatment. For the seventh generation SXV40 series, the same was done, although the Australian-designed Toyota Aurion which is based on the seventh generation Camry was the donor model. The Aurion features revised front- and rear-end treatment and changes to the interior, but is fitted with the same powertrains. An up-branded luxury version of the Camry was sold in Japan as the Toyota Windom until 2006; the related Lexus ES shares major chassis and drivetrain components with the Camry.

In the United States, the Camry has been the best selling car for nine of the last ten years starting in 1997, with the only exception being 2001. The Camry also sells very well in Australia, Canada, and a number of Asian markets—in particular Cambodia where the vast majority of cars are Camrys. Despite its success, it has often been criticized for its bland design and lack of sportiness compared to its rivals. It has not sold as well in Europe and its homemarket Japan; as its design is ill-suited for European and Japanese tastes.

The seventh-generation Toyota Camry is the first generation in which the Camry has been available as a gasoline/electric hybrid. The Camry Hybrid utilizes Toyota’s second generation Hybrid Synergy Drive and contains a 4-cylinder engine with 147 hp (110 kW) in conjunction with a 40 hp (30 kW) electric motor for a combined output of 187 hp (139 kW). The Camry is currently the third Toyota model to be offered as a hybrid, the others being the Toyota Prius and the Toyota Highlander.

Camry Hybrids were initially built solely in Japan, though the majority of production has since shifted to Toyota’s Georgetown, Kentucky plant, which is projected to produce 45,000 of the vehicles per year. In June 2008, Toyota Motor Corporation has announced that the Camry Hybrid will also be built in a Thailand plant in 2009 and in Melbourne in 2010 with an annual production capacity of 9,000 and 10,000 respectively.

EPA fuel economy estimates for the 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid are 40 mpg (US) (5.9 L/100 km/48 mpg imp) (City) and 38 mpg (US) (6.2 L/100 km/46 mpg imp) (Highway).[21] EPA’s revised method of estimating fuel economy for 2008 and subsequent model years, which now considers the effects of air conditioning, rapid acceleration and cold temperatures, estimates 33 mpg (US) (7.1 L/100 km/40 mpg imp) (City) and 34 mpg (US) (6.9 L/100 km/41 mpg imp) (Highway).

Note: This article is one of the 2009 toyota camry reviews around the net.

[Via: Wikipedia]

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