Will be sold under the “Give One, Get One” scheme 

 The $100 laptop will be available for purchasing to the general public from the US, but under the G1G1 scheme (“Give one, Get One”). This will allow US residents to buy two laptops for $399. One laptop will be sent to the buyer and the other will be received by a child from the developing world. The G1G1 scheme will offer the laptops for only two weeks, beginning with
November 12.

This offer came after the founder of the “$100 laptop” project, Nicholas Negroponte, stated that there were many situations in which the governments of the developing countries didn’t give concrete orders after verbal agreements.

The interest expressed in having people from developed countries participating in the program was huge since the first day when the initiative was launched.

This particular laptop was created to be used by children and it has several innovations, such as a sunlight readable display that allows outdoor use. It can be powered by solar energy, foot-pump or pull-string powered chargers and it has a waterproof case. Although its price was targeted at $100 it now costs $188. The hardware manufacturers started producing the components in July. The production of these laptops will be viable if the organization meets the minimum three million orders.

The “One Laptop Per Child” organization notices several advantages to offering the laptops to developing countries. They consider this way more people will contribute with software development support and content. Also, by using the G1G1 scheme people from less developed countries will receive laptops. The first countries that will receive the donated laptops will be Rwanda, Afghanistan, Haiti and Cambodia. Other less developed countries can join the scheme by biding, and the laptops will be sold through the xogiving.org website.

It seems there are at least 25,000 laptops available through the G1G1 scheme, and the shipping will be done in two lots, one until the end of the year and the other lot will go to the buyers in the first quarter of 2008.

[Via Softpedia]

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